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Business Services Interpreter Training Interpreting Spanish Interpreter Spanish Translator

Are you a “Good Interpreter”

Pico Conference

After 18 years working as a professional interpreter many people always ask “Do you consider yourself a Good Interpreter?”… My answer will always be the same. I consider myself a good interpreter because:

  1. I take pride in my work
  2. I love what I do
  3. I take my time in researching and learning the industry, terminology to do my job the best that I can…
  4. So, yes I consider myself a “Good Interpreter”

Now, I know what you are thinking “Man, this woman is full of herself 🙂 she’s kinda conceded”, hahaha but its OK., that just means I’m confident of myself and I know what I can and can’t do.

Now, don’t get me wrong there’s more to this…So, for starters the interpreter must – as our colleague would also state ( https://rpstranslations.wordpress.com/2018/04/16/what-makes-a-good-interpreter/ )

  • Be able to communicate from one language into a target language.  But don’t forget, the ultimate and “main goal is to make sure that everything interpreted was conveyed in such a manner that the person receiving the information, is able to understand the language of the speaker” The Professional Interpreter– “We are the VOICE”.  So, it is VERY IMPORTANT that, the interpreter understands both the source and target language.  A good interpreter must be able to understand, synthesize, and have command of grammar, culture, and vocabulary” The Professional Interpreter
  • Be able to interpret everything “word for word”, but more importantly that everyone is able to understand him/her.  “Heavy breathing, coughing, slurping, rushing through the speech, and chasing speakers too close to what they just said makes you not only look bad” The Professional Interpreter, but even worse sound bad, so even when you are a good interpreter, you need to make sure you keep the pace and make your speakers aware that they must keep a pace (in order for you to be able to interpret everything). “Good voice, décalage, volume, rhythm, pace, voice modulation, clarity, enunciation, are a very important part of a rendition.” The Professional Interpreter
  • Finally, I strongly believe that a good interpreter who gets along with others is more desirable than a great interpreter who creates conflict everywhere.

To me a “rock star interpreter”, is one who understands a “concepts, digests it, and is able to convey it to the client in a pleasant clear voice, so it can be understood by the foreign language speaker; and does it all while being professional, good colleague, and decent human.” The Professional Interpreter

So, what are your thoughts of a “Good Rock Star Interpreter”… Thanks to “The Professional Interpreter for sharing some wise words… Don’t forget to follow him at: RPSTRANSLATIONS “The Professional Interpreter”

 

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Business Services Interpreter Training Interpreting Spanish Interpreter Spanish Translator

Sign the Show and Waka

Scrolling through my Facebook post and I come across this awesome Sign Language Interpreter dancing to the music and getting in the grove and doing her thing – one of the many reasons why I love what I do #interpreting !!!

Holly Maniatty found recognition for rap while interpreting at a Killer Mike set festival and when Killer Mike saw her and noticed her, he was fascinated by her skills and talent that he jumped down from the stage to the raised platform and Maniatty colleague said he started dancing with them.  Also, said “that she had been initially employed by a company; however as an interpreter for a Marilyn Manson concert in Rochester after all her coworkers passed on the opportunity, eventually opening the door for her to be recruited by a company out of Portland, Maine that specialized in festival ASL interpreting.” Also, said “that by this point she was beginning to work with various musicians the likes of U2, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Saget, and eventually The Beastie Boys at Bonnaroo in 2009, which lead to her becoming a main-stay interpreter for the rap community.

Check these 3 awesome ASL Certified Interpreters Rap Battle with Wiz Khalifa

Check her out also here interpreting for #SnoopDogg

“Communicating in Your Language, One-Language-At-A-Time!”

The language industry is one of the fastest growing industries across the Country!  If you, or someone you know is interested in learning more about what you need to Start a Career as an Interpreter, please send them my way!

BecomeInterpreter

 

I would love to teach you and share the beauties of this industry!

#Interpreters #Interpreting #Translation #interpretation #translator #interprete #traductora #ArtistSupportingArtists #SignTheShow #DeafCulture #Access#Entertainment #Music #Comedy #Theater #Hustle w/ #gratitude & #love

 

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Business Services Interpreter Training Interpreting

Your Website is Your Business (Make it Count)

Your Website is Your Business (Make it Count)

Today’s digital world means people’s first impression of your business likely comes from a screen. Your website is one of the biggest influencing factors that determine whether potential customers become clients or keep clicking. Read on for insights on how to make your site stand out and serve both you and your customers.

Content matters

No matter how visually-pleasing your website is, no amount of design can compensate for bad (or missing) content. The articles, blogs, videos, and images on your website should serve a purpose other than selling your services. Your customers want certain questions answered. Always list your hours of operation, contact information, and answers to commonly-asked-questions about your business. Providing your customers with relevant and useful content will keep their interest. Content, such as white papers, eBooks, and DIY videos, are excellent ways to draw clients in and may be offered for free (on top of your other content) in exchange for an email address. This will help you build your contact list while giving your customers something of value as a reward for their loyalty. A word of caution here: only email customers when you have something to say they will want to hear.

Sluggish websites get skipped

Your customer’s user experience doesn’t begin until they reach your site. And research suggest that nearly half of all searchers move on after just a few seconds if their content hasn’t loaded. You can speed up your site in a number of ways, including choosing a server appropriate for your content and using images sized and formatted correctly for display. Google’s PageSpeed Insights tool can analyze your site and provide further suggestions.

Small business, big presence

You don’t have to have a billion dollar budget to optimize your presence online. Many small home-based businesses look much larger (and more professional) than they really are all because of their website. If you can’t afford to pay for web design services, you can still get your site up and running using GoDaddy’s drag and drop Website Builder. For less than $400 per year, you can create your own website with built-in security and mobile shopping capabilities. Your web presence doesn’t stop with your domain either. Utilize free social media tools such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram to grab user attention and direct them to your business. Social Media Today’s Andrew Hutchinson offers a number of great tips on how to write an effective tweet in this post. Take steps to ensure your branding — logo, color scheme, business name, etc. — remains the same across all platforms.

Maps and apps

Make yourself easy to find by utilizing free apps for your site. For instance, your address should link your users directly to the Google Maps feature on their phone’s GPS. You should also enable one-click calling and link directly to your full site.

Workhorse of the web

Put your website to work for you by integrating it into your small business accounting and workflow software. QuickBooks, for instance, offers the option of syncing your website to your accounting. This will eliminate the time of having to do it yourself and improve your overall productivity. Depending on your business type, there are also a number of specialized workflow programs that allow orders from your site to go directly into production.

Remember, people are impatient and want a site that works without delays. People want relevant content and the ability to reach out without jumping through hoops. So, design your site with your customers in mind, and you’ll make your home-based business look and feel like a Fortune 500 without spending a fortune.

Need more tips on how to run a home business? Check out the Small Business Administration at SBA.gov and this article by Redfin for practical advice on everything from office design to achieving the ever-elusive work/life balance.

Your Website is Your Business (Make it Count)

Today’s digital world means people’s first impression of your business likely comes from a screen. Your website is one of the biggest influencing factors that determine whether potential customers become clients or keep clicking. Read on for insights on how to make your site stand out and serve both you and your customers.

Content matters

No matter how visually-pleasing your website is, no amount of design can compensate for bad (or missing) content. The articles, blogs, videos, and images on your website should serve a purpose other than selling your services. Your customers want certain questions answered. Always list your hours of operation, contact information, and answers to commonly-asked-questions about your business. Providing your customers with relevant and useful content will keep their interest. Content, such as white papers, eBooks, and DIY videos, are excellent ways to draw clients in and may be offered for free (on top of your other content) in exchange for an email address. This will help you build your contact list while giving your customers something of value as a reward for their loyalty. A word of caution here: only email customers when you have something to say they will want to hear.

Sluggish websites get skipped

Your customer’s user experience doesn’t begin until they reach your site. And research suggest that nearly half of all searchers move on after just a few seconds if their content hasn’t loaded. You can speed up your site in a number of ways, including choosing a server appropriate for your content and using images sized and formatted correctly for display. Google’s PageSpeed Insights tool can analyze your site and provide further suggestions.

Small business, big presence

You don’t have to have a billion dollar budget to optimize your presence online. Many small home-based businesses look much larger (and more professional) than they really are all because of their website. If you can’t afford to pay for web design services, you can still get your site up and running using GoDaddy’s drag and drop Website Builder. For less than $400 per year, you can create your own website with built-in security and mobile shopping capabilities. Your web presence doesn’t stop with your domain either. Utilize free social media tools such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram to grab user attention and direct them to your business. Social Media Today’s Andrew Hutchinson offers a number of great tips on how to write an effective tweet in this post. Take steps to ensure your branding — logo, color scheme, business name, etc. — remains the same across all platforms.

Maps and apps

Make yourself easy to find by utilizing free apps for your site. For instance, your address should link your users directly to the Google Maps feature on their phone’s GPS. You should also enable one-click calling and link directly to your full site.

Workhorse of the web

Put your website to work for you by integrating it into your small business accounting and workflow software. QuickBooks, for instance, offers the option of syncing your website to your accounting. This will eliminate the time of having to do it yourself and improve your overall productivity. Depending on your business type, there are also a number of specialized workflow programs that allow orders from your site to go directly into production.

Remember, people are impatient and want a site that works without delays. People want relevant content and the ability to reach out without jumping through hoops. So, design your site with your customers in mind, and you’ll make your home-based business look and feel like a Fortune 500 without spending a fortune.

Need more tips on how to run a home business? Check out the Small Business Administration at SBA.gov and this article by Redfin for practical advice on everything from office design to achieving the ever-elusive work/life balance.

Burges

Image via Pixabay

Article provided by: Dean Burgess

Excitepreneur.net | dean@excitepreneur.net  

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Interpreter Training Interpreting Spanish Interpreter

What is the difference between Certified and Qualified Interpreter?

What is the difference between certified and qualified?

understand that many businesses and corporations that require interpreting and translating services are not aware of specific qualification requirements or contracting laws; there are many interpreting agencies that do not follow strict guidelines in providing professional and proficient services. A report done by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics for 2008-2009 (old report) found that 22 percent of interpreters and translators are self-employed. Screenshot_20170611-182012If that is true, are agencies requiring them to verify a business license, qualifications and certifications?

I would like to explain a few things about this particular industry in order to help potential clients make the right choice in choosing an interpreting services company.

What is the difference between certified and qualified Interpreter?

When I was operating as an Agency I had established a contract, with characterization for these terms that correlate directly with a definition given by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics. Certified interpreter is a person who has passed the California Court Interpreter certification Examination and who has fulfilled the corresponding Judicial Council requirements are referred to as certified interpreters. The state personnel board also provides a certification test for medical and administrative hearing interpreters for California. Qualified interpreter is a person who is not a certified interpreter and who speaks the language to be translated into English fluently and who speaks English fluently and that poses a minimum of 2 years of interpreting experience.

Different rates are established by the court system and interpreters themselves based on their experience and the amount of years they have been in the industry. Unfortunately, many interpreters will increase their rates based on a fellow interpreters increase. Businesses must recognize rates should be based on NOT ONLY certification, qualifications, experience, type of appointment and also whether or not the client requires a certified interpreter vs. a qualified interpreter.  In most cases a certified interpreter is not required; therefore businesses should NOT have to pay a certified rate.  More importantly, businesses need to realize that many “Certified” interpreters are NOT DEEM QUALIFIED for all Venues.  Note: I’m NOT YET CERTIFIED, yet I’ve had to replace many “certified interpreters” that have been excused from their assignments due to the “Lack of Experience, Qualifications with the terminology”…I have over 17+ years of Professional experience in a variety of venues – from: Legal to Environmental, Political, Medical, etc… I also have experience in both Consecutive and Simultaneous mode of Interpretation vs. many interpreters who ONLY have experience in one or the other.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics wrote There is currently no universal form of certification required of interpreters and translators in the United States.Although different states have implemented oral and written tests to verify capabilities, there are still many interpreters that base their experience and qualifications from translating for family members and having grown up in a bilingual household.

would also like to point out that the term “certified” can be misused by the interpreters and many will claim they are certified to gain a higher rate of pay, or more assignments. When I used to search for their information in the databases to verify certification, sometimes I was unable to locate their name(s) on the Judicial Council websites.  Note: There is a list available to the public with the names of persons who are deceased, retired, or de-certified – no longer certified to interpret in the court systems. Often times interpreters will continue to claim they are certified to maintain a high pay rate, or to get more assignments and agencies are unaware that they are using an interpreter who claimed to be “Certified” when in deed they were either no longer certified, de-certified, etc.
As the industry continues to grow with the diversity of our nation, I had implemented a strict screening process for interpreters and translators that pushed this industry into a level professionalism that it deserved. A teacher within their first year of teaching does not have the same experience, or rate of pay as a tenured instructor; the same should be established for interpreters and translators. If there are counties that require a business license for independent contractors then it should be implemented and not overlooked by agencies, businesses, doctors, lawyers, etc. – Why? Because just like employees, there is more and more “Independent Contract Interpreter both Certified and Qualified”, claiming to be Employees of the agency or the contracting party, meaning that more and more Law Suit abuse is occurring within this industry. That is why setting standards is very important to our agency, although management takes high measures in implementing these steps “employees” will not always adhere, causing problems for the agency.  We try our best to be an agency who will NOT overlook requirements just to attain an interpreter for an assignment. We go the extra mile to ensure that our clients receive what they deserve.

If you are looking for a Qualified, Professional, Experienced Interpreter / Translator for any of your events, documents, or venues – please don’t hesitate in contacting me

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Interpreter Training Interpreting Spanish Interpreter

Seeking an Interpreting Career?

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Seeking an Interpreter Career?

  • Do you know what it takes?
  • Speaking a Second Language is NOT the ONLY skill you need
  • Do you have Business Skills?
    • Do you have Sales and Marketing Skills?
    • Do you have Accounting Skills?

Working as an Interpreter / Translator, is a very rewarding career.

  • Love to work and help others?
  • Love to travel?
  • Love languages?
  • Love working at your own pace?
  • Love being your own boss?

Then this may be just the career for you!

I have been working as a Professional Spanish Interpreter for over 17 years, as well as an Interpreter Trainer and Entrepreneur.  I’m also a previous Interpreting Agency Owner (2000 – 2014), so I know first hand what it takes to get your  Interpreting Career going!

Many agencies will tell you to “Get Certified”, Okay, so you get Certified, you take the test and then what?  It’s like getting a Degree with no job experience! Now days, many “millenniums”, or anyone for that matter will invest in their career, while working 1-2 jobs vs. working in a field that inspires them, or doing internships in the field that inspires them! By the time they get their degree and they try to apply for jobs – guess what? They are unable to get a job because they don’t have any work related experience!

So, my recommendation to become a Interpreter is to:

  1. Make sure that you are Fluent in both the English and Target language
  2. Decide – Do you want to be a Medical, Legal, Conference, or ASL Interpreter
  3. Learn the; Medical, Legal, General terminology both in English and the Target Language
  4. Obtain Interpreter Training; Code of Ethics, the Do’s and Don’ts
  5. Gain Experience by helping friends and families, or even accepting “basic interpreting” assignments.  When I mean basic assignments I mean: Follow ups, Doctor basic visits, or even Attorney / Client appointments (only if you are familiar with the Medical / Legal) terminology!
“It takes more than just knowing a Second Language to become a Professional Interpreter”
Note: Many agencies will CONTRACT YOU without experience, or without skills, or qualifications; however, you! Yes, YOU! you are putting yourself at RISK, but more importantly, you are putting the English Limited Speaker at RISK!
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So, PLEASE BEFORE ACCEPTING ANY ASSIGNMENT – make sure you are COMPETENT and QUALIFIED to take on the task! Don’t just do it for the MONEY $$$…

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Soon to Come my Step by Step guide on “The Business Guide for Interpreters (TM)”